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February 2, 2012

AEI Wind Weekly News

Filed under: News,Uncategorized — Tags: , — admin @ 2:23 pm

Wind farm construction to bring millions to region
Cielo Wind Power is gathering a team to try to beat a deadline to construct the Spinning Spur Wind Ranch, and it wants to steer $50 to $70 million in contracts to regional businesses.
The work would be part of the $190-million project set for 20,000 acres on the edge of the Caprock just west of Vega. The target start date is Dec. 1… click here to view full article

Promote wind, not oil
You claim that President Obama made a “serious mistake” in opposing the oil pipeline from Canada. This line would pass over the Ogallala Aquifer and across miles and miles of some of the richest farm ground in our country…consider what the environmental damage might be, especially for the aquifer. It is claimed that one quart of oil can make 1 million gallons of water undrinkable… click here to view full article

Goldwind secures $5.6 billion expansion loan
CHINA: Goldwind has signed an agreement with China Development Bank (CDB) for a CNY 35 billion ($5.6 billion) loan for domestic wind farm construction and other businesses…

July 25, 2011

AEI’s Former Director in Texas Monthly

Filed under: Local News,Local People,News,Texas News — Tags: , , , , — Georgia Romig @ 12:11 pm

Texas Monthly will be publishing an article featuring the Alternative Energy Institute‘s former director, Dr. Vaughn Nelson. Nelson was also a professor at West Texas A&M University and recently authored the book Wind Energy: Renewable Energy and the Environment.

Here is a brief preview of the article A Mighty Wind (by Kate Galbraith and Asher Price).

One cool Lubbock afternoon in 1979, Father Joe James made a kite. He nailed together a small wooden cross, glued paper across it, and on the long tail of twine tied streamers every five feet. Then he walked out of St. John Neumann Catholic Church, the energy-saving, below-ground house of worship he had designed, climbed up a modest slope, and launched the contraption above the church’s school and football field. Staring up at the fluttering streamers, he could gauge which way the wind was blowing and where it blew hardest.

To read more, click here. Texas Monthly requires you to subscribe in order to read it’s full articles.

Thank you Class 4 Winds for giving us a heads up on this!

July 18, 2011

Local News: Xcel to move idle turbine to Tucumcari

Filed under: Local News,News,Texas News,Wind Energy — Tags: , , , — Georgia Romig @ 9:32 am

More local news via the Amarillo Globe-News! This article is by Kevin Welch.

Xcel Energy plans on moving an idle turbine from near Borger to Tucumcari, N.M., to provide backup power there. The unit has provided additional power during peak demand using natural gas, said Xcel spokesman Wes Reeves, but the company will convert it to run on diesel fuel.

For more, click here to read the full article.

January 28, 2011

It’s Not Just Oil: Wind Power Approaches 8% of Texas Electricity in 2010

Filed under: News,Texas News,Wind Energy — Tags: , , — admin @ 12:26 pm

From Repower America, by Ryan Koronowski, ACP Research Director:

When you think of Texas and the energy resources it possesses, the first image that might come to your mind is an oil derrick.

This is perfectly reasonable — Texas produces the most crude oil in the United States and more than twice as much as California. But oil isn’t the only energy resource Texas produces in large volumes.

In fact, Texas also leads the U.S. in wind power production. And business is booming for the companies and communities in the Texas panhandle wind corridor. Many farmers and ranchers love wind because when they allow the turbines on their land, the operators can pay landowners leasing fees and even a small percentage of revenues. A report released this week noted that wind power represented 7.8% of total electricity production for most electricity consumers in Texas last year. This is up from 4.9% in 2008 — a huge increase.

Click here to read the full article.

June 1, 2010

WT to test 50-story wind turbine

From The Amarillo Globe-News:

West Texas A&M University became part of a push Monday to raise expectations for a Spanish company’s wind turbines – machines that could double the power production of today’s standard turbines.

“It will be fundamental research like how to make a better blade with light, robust material, testing aerodynamics, the integrity of blades,” said Theresa Maldonado, associate vice chancellor for research of the Texas A&M University System and director of the Energy Engineering Institute, which will participate.

Gamesa Technology, based in Spain, signed contracts Monday with A&M and several affiliated entities calling for research on energy projects, including a turbine rated at a production capacity of 4.5 megawatts to be installed at WT’s Nance Ranch. The company itself only makes a 2-megawatt turbine now and most land-based turbines don’t exceed that.

Click here to read more.

May 24, 2010

Local News: Texas A&M University System and Gamesa Technology Corp. Announce Plan to Collaborate on Nation’s Largest Wind Turbine

From Alt Energy Mag, concerning WTAMU’s own Regional Wind Test Center:

The Texas A&M University System and Gamesa Technology Corp. (Gamesa) announced an agreement today with the intention to install a new generation of wind turbine at West Texas A&M University, coordinated jointly by the Energy Engineering Institute and the Alternative Energy Institute of the A&M System. The Gamesa G10X (also known as the G128) would be the largest of its kind in the country, while providing substantial advances in production output, energy efficiency and noise reduction.

With today’s signing ceremony at the 2010 American Wind Energy Association WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, A&M System and Gamesa officials have initiated a long-term agreement in which the system, through its multiple members, will conduct ongoing research and testing for Gamesa’s energy-related projects. System members include the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (Energy Engineering Institute), Texas A&M University, West Texas A&M (Alternative Energy Institute) and the Texas Transportation Institute. The initial collaboration will involve installation of the Gamesa G10X, a 4.5-megawatt turbine that has a higher tower height and a larger rotor diameter (420 feet/128 meters) than existing land based turbines, which allows it to access better wind resources that further increase its production capability.

Click here or visit Gamesa’s official web site to read more.

August 19, 2009

Texas News: Panhandle has wind energy potential

Filed under: Local News,News,Texas News,Wind Energy — Tags: , , , , — admin @ 4:15 pm

We got  this bit of news from Class 4 Winds… some information on Wind Energy development in the Panhandle, and why it hasn’t been going faster, courtesy of the Plainview Daily Herald. Here’s an excerpt from the article:

FLOYDADA ( Aug. 17, 2009) – Landowners in the panhandle of Texas know the wind blows and many of them are starting to question why they haven’t seen more wind energy development in the area. At a recent meeting held in Floyd County, experts reassured landowners that there is still potential for wind energy development.

Richard Amato, president and CEO of Venti Energy and wind subcommittee chair for the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association (TREIA) was the first speaker at Caprock Plains Wind Energy Association’s (CPWEA) annual membership meeting. Amato presented the attendees with a wind industry update, explaining that wind energy development in Texas has come a long way but it still has the potential to grow.

Click here to read the rest!

 
   

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